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How Was It For You? LDA Respondents Feed Back on Medical Market Research Participation

How Was It For You? LDA Respondents Feed Back on Medical Market Research Participation

The ‘patient experience’ of disease and its treatments is of huge value for pharmaceutical companies or medical device manufacturers. People who live day-in and day-out with a condition can provide unique perspectives on the impact it has on their lives, particularly where the disease is rare or low-prevalence. Among other things, the information shared via research interviews can be used to improve patient support programmes, test equipment and identify gaps in knowledge.

LDA Research now has a decade of experience recruiting patients globally to take part in surveys, one-to-one interviews and online ethnographic studies. We’re very good at finding patients willing to take part in research, and our experienced moderators are at ease as interviewers or facilitators. For most of our respondents though, being the subject of research is a unique and unusual event. We surveyed some of them to find out more about their experience of medical market research participation.


Respondent Feedback Surveys

In order to access respondents’ feedback on participating in research studies, we surveyed two patient groups we’d recently worked with; stoma users and Alzheimer’s patients. Individuals in both groups had participated in one-to-one online interviews for LDA Research and were asked 5 questions relating to their experience.

1. Participatory Motivation

As researchers we were interested to know why people agreed to take part in research interviews. In both groups the responses to this question showed that there was altruism at work. Individuals wanted to use their experiences to help future patients. A number of the stoma users felt that they had developed an expertise that they were keen put to use for the good of others.

“I am always interested in helping out with research because it shapes the future for other people who need the services in the future.”

One Alzheimer’s participant was taking part because they had found it difficult to access any support, so the research was a way to evidence this. Another Alzheimer’s participant viewed the research as an opportunity to “use thinking skills” and “stay alert and active as I slow down mentally”.

2. Being Interviewed

Participants were asked what it was like to be interviewed about their condition. Both groups described the enjoyment they felt at being asked questions and having their responses listened to carefully, and valued. The interviewers were praised for creating a relaxed atmosphere, and giving time to the process.

“Length of time and one-to-one allowed for more in depth discussion with very friendly interviewer. Felt they were interested rather than just trial number gathering”

The stoma users were particularly pleased to know that their experiences were of use, and a few of them appreciated being able to ask questions of the interviewer and receive responses that added to their knowledge. One stoma respondent expressed relief at being able to talk easily about ‘embarrassing’ issues. Another was pleased to learn about the research that the interview was contributing to.

3. Advice on Improving Interviews

LDA constantly reviews their interview process, so we were interested to see if there were any suggestions for improvements from interviewees. When asked if there were any changes they would make to the interview set-up to improve the interview experience, the stoma group participants said they were entirely satisfied and wanted no changes.

Two members of the Alzheimer’s group felt that more reassurance and support prior to the interview would have been helpful to calm nerves. This kind of information is really useful to our ongoing support strategy. We currently work with a number of support groups and provide aftercare for our research participants.

4. How Does LDA Research Excel in Research Interviews?

The answers for this section of the survey were longer than for any other question and were similar across both groups:

  • They use plain language in communications and avoid ambiguity.
  • Friendly interviewers who put you at your ease.
  • There is clear respect for the views of patients and information is reliably passed on to clients.
  • Respondents are given plenty of time to respond to questions; there’s no feeling of pressure.
  • The interviewers are good at listening to the answers give, which is important because what we say shapes future developments.

5. Advice for Potential Respondents

The LDA team was particularly interested in this question, as the responses given provided valuable insights for the kind of approach we make to potential participants. As with Question 1, a number of the respondents emphasised the future benefits that respondents were contributing to – one of them described it as a “win-win” situation.

“Enjoy the experience with the knowledge that your answers will be helping to improve the care of whatever condition from that which they are suffering for themselves and others.”

One of the Alzheimer’s participants recommended participation as a means of improving your self-confidence. Another suggested that it’s a way to get your voice heard and help to shape future treatments. A number of respondents from both groups emphasised the need for ‘honesty’ when answering questions. One of them stated that honesty is important in order to “get better products”.


About LDA Research

LDA Research is an international research provider specialising in the pharmaceutical industry and medical device sector. Our team is renowned for going the extra mile to find the right people for our clients. We use a range of methodologies to produce our qualitative research data. These are always facilitated by professional moderators and interviewers with previous experience working for medical companies or from senior roles in specialist healthcare market research.


If you would like to find out more about our approach, or talk to a member of the team about medical market research, call us today on 01525 861436

What Will Post-Lockdown Medical Market Research Look Like?

What Will Post-Lockdown Medical Market Research Look Like?

The long Covid winter is finally drawing to a close, and the UK is inching ever closer to a graduated end to lockdown. After a year of businesses scrambling to adapt to extraordinary circumstances, we’re now starting to wonder what awaits us as the ‘new normal’ asserts itself. We won’t be returning to the pre-Covid world – too much has changed to allow for that. But do we have a clear idea of what a post-Covid future looks like?

After the endless ‘present’ of the pandemic comes the opportunity for businesses to shape their future once more. The transition will involve making decisions about what we’ve learnt that’s useful, and what ‘got us through’ but is no longer required. At LDA Research we’re starting to review the changes we’ve experienced in the past 12 months,  in light of the future we want to shape for our clients.

4 questions have emerged for us that are key to determining what post-lockdown medical market research will look like:


How Will Global Vaccination Programmes Affect International Travel?

For global research organisations the pandemic is far from over. Whilst the UK vaccination programme is a success, and the dropping infection rates signal the end of lockdown for us, other countries are at different stages. Many European countries are still in some form of lockdown, and UNICEF reports that there are still 130 countries waiting to begin vaccinating their populations.

There is currently a lively discussion concerning the development of Vaccine Passports in order to maintain Covid-safe borders between countries. Until a system is established, travel between countries is unlikely to return to the seamless movement we experienced prior to Covid. As a result, tech solutions will remain central to LDA’s research offering.

Will Clients Want to Maintain Cost-Effective Online Methodologies?

Over the past year clients have experienced the magic of Zoom as an alternative to focus groups, in-person interviewing and tele-depth interviews. For telephone interviews this represents an upgrade to the interview experience, and it’s cost neutral. Where Zoom replaces person-to-person encounters it could be considered a ‘downgrade’, however it’s far cheaper and clients are enthusiastic adopters of the tech approach.

There’s no doubt clients will be looking at their budgets and seeing Zoom as a viable alternative to other kinds of research methodologies. Money, however, won’t be the only factor. Online research interviews allow clients to drop in on the process, and tweak the questions asked in response to what they see. This ‘hands-on’ option is a new kind of challenge for research facilitators to manage, whilst being hugely popular with clients who appreciate the new flexibility it affords.

Is There Any Rationale For Re-Introducing Face-to-Face Interviews?

The LDA Research team recognises that this is a delicate moment for the work of qualitative researchers. Costs, efficacy and pragmatism seem to be pointing towards a tech alternative to in-person groups. So we are taking time to survey the effects Zoom is having on our work and review the qualities that are lost when using the online alternative.

  • Dynamics. Group dynamics are altered when everyone is interacting from a different location. Most noticeably, the technology is not yet unobtrusive enough to allow for a natural conversational flow.
  • Research Aims. Some of the focus groups we set up are designed to reproduce the way a team interacts in their working environment. It is almost impossible to reproduce this kind of simulation online.
  • Product-Based Focus Groups. Online groups can’t touch, use, or experience new products online. Even if products can be sent to individuals, the quality of the experience is different to that of a group.
  • Range of Activities. There are a number of group activities that become ‘clunky’ or difficult online. Visual exercises, such as ‘mapping’ require the use of flip charts and pens. Break-out activities aren’t really possible.

Will Travel Remain Integral to The Research We Do?

Pre-Covid travel was very much a part of the LDA Research landscape. Projects were often planned around where clients, participants or specialists were located, and the cost of travelling and accommodation was ‘baked-in’ to the budget. Now those physical pre-conditions have melted away but our research has continued. So will travel become an anachronism – even within the UK – as we move forward?

There are plenty of reasons not to travel in the near future. The uneven rolling out of vaccinations, and the ongoing vulnerability of some participants make online meetings the default option. There’s also the advantage of being able to bring together experts remotely who might, in the past, have been hampered by distance.

The global pandemic is not, of course, the only crisis we’re facing. Our goals of reaching carbon neutrality over the next two decades will, in part, depend upon a reduction in the amount of travelling we do. Covid may just be nudging us in the right direction.


LDA Research is an international research provider specialising in the pharmaceutical industry and medical device sector. If you would like to talk to a member of the team about our medical market research, call us today on 01525 861436

medical device market research

Medical Device Market Research

LDA Research was set up in 2011, in Bedfordshire, and for the past 7 years the core team has been pursuing their passion globally. We’re lucky enough to spend our time providing specialist qualitative research for the rapidly growing medical device sector. Every member of the team is committed to providing high quality, bespoke market research solutions for management consultants, design agencies, advertising companies, medical clients and health market research agencies.

Why Use Qualitative Research?

Qualitative medical device marketing research depends upon person-to-person interaction as a means of garnering opinions, motivations, ideas and themes active in the target group for any new medical device. It’s a highly effective methodology for understanding customer satisfaction, sector pricing intelligence, market attractiveness, innovation assessment and perceived use value.

We pride ourselves on the responsive nature of our research methodology, and on our ability – as a team – to tailor our research to the business needs of our clients. That may mean accessing hard-to-reach patients, incorporating tech in innovative ways or moving beyond our database to reach out to participants in regions, or countries that we haven’t worked with before. As a research team we love a challenge, and we keep going until we get what our clients need!

Quantitative Medical Device Market Research for Development

Clients often ask us to find out for them where the greatest unmet needs are in a particular area. This may feed into an R&D process, or it may be at the stage of fine tuning of a device which has already been developed. Dependent on the research aims, we would normally seek to conduct phone, web conferencing, or face-to-face interviews with healthcare professionals, and thought leaders operating within the appropriate professional environment.

Qualitative Research for Usability Testing

Regulation (EU) 2017/745 has raised the European bar for the usability testing of medical devices. We are, therefore, seeing a heightened demand from our clients for device simulations. Being able to see how patients interact with a new product or device provides valuable information to developers and marketers. The ensuing report will often lead to an understanding of training requirements, or refinements needed in the way the device is packaged or presented for use.

Qualitative Patient Focused Research

We have a great track record for pulling together patient focus groups either as online forums, or – if the geographical dispersion is local, or national – as part of a workshop. This methodology is particularly useful where a training need has been identified and the training programme has been designed. Patients will often point out crucial issues that have been overlooked by developers, or use their first hand experience to provide solutions to challenges that have been bugging the development team.

Post Launch Qualitative Research

We can help with the entire product lifecycle, providing accurate, authentic medical market research. Once a device is launched, we are often asked to carry out ‘follow-on’ research with patients using it. We’re always particularly interested in the data provided by people who have ceased to use the product, or those who are aware of the product but have not yet decided to adopt it.

Skilled Moderators are Key to Effective Medical Device Market Research

The skill of the researcher is always paramount to achieving effective result in ethnographic qualitative research. We take care to recruit moderators and interviewers who have a background in either medical research or specialist healthcare. This professional expertise allows them to ask detailed – and at times – probing questions of clients. Granular responses help developers understand to what degree their product is supporting the patient and fulfilling the needs of the market.